Weaponized data (and comms logistics)

Check out this week’s Financial Access Initiative newsletter. The first item is on the politics of evidence-based policy, and a pretty interesting debate and timeline to follow on the release of 2 papers with different conclusions about the effects of minimum wage increases.

Quoting below:

1. Weaponized Data and American Inequality: Last week I linked to a paper finding minimal effects from minimum wage increases, unaware that a huge explosion of debate on this issue was about to occur. If you follow these things at all, you know that last Friday a paper on Seattle’s minimum wage increase was released finding no job losses or cuts in hours. Monday, a different paper finding large losses for households with minimum wage jobs was released. There’s a whole lot out there now on the two papers so I’m not going to rehash those arguments (if you need to catch up, try this or this or this or just scroll through Twitter). I want to focus on the backstory of why there were two papers released so close to each other because it’s important for the future of research and policy-making. As detailed here, what appears to have happened is researchers at UW shared an early draft of their paper (using tax data that is rarely available in minimum wage studies) with the Seattle mayor’s office. The mayor’s office didn’t like the conclusions so asked a different set of researchers to write their own paper–and release it just before the planned date for release of the UW paper. While I have no special insight into the exact details of what happened, the prospect that the report is accurate disturbs me a great deal. It’s a blatant step toward what the author of the Seattle Weekly piece calls “weaponized data.” Be afraid for evidence-based policy. Very afraid.

[…also, see the end of this newsletter for a visualization of missing data. 😃 – “A reddit group put together a map about the data in maps, illustrating where data is missing. Source: @maxcroser and reddit“]

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